A place to share ideas about play in a Prep classroom

Archive for the ‘Colour Mixing’ Category

Warm and Cool Colours

One of our favourite books is One by Kathryn Otoshi and it explores the connection between colours and feelings. This provoked a conversation about colours being warm and cool and we decided to explore this further.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First we looked at cool colours because blue was the first colour we met in the book, One. We looked at and discussed art images using blues and  greens. We talked about the difference in shades and how they effected the feeling of the images. We also talked about the lines that could represent ice breaking and what these might look like.

One of the pictures we observed carefully was this one by Picasso.

 

 

 

 

 

We explored his inclusion of yellow and red/brown in the painting and how it effected the feel of the painting and compared it with this very different picture that exclusively used blues and purples.

 

 

 

 

 

 

When it came time to create our own cool colour drawing, we used our observations for ideas. The children decided that “sharp”, “pointy” and “zigzag” lines would be best and drew 3 of each from the top to the bottom of the page. Next they turned their page around by 1/4 and drew another 3 lines from 1 side to another. The children then filled in the shapes they had created on the page using various shades of blue and green.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once all the shapes were filled with colour, a white oil pastel was used to outline them with some children drawing zigzag lines in white over the top as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We used the same process when exploring warm colours. Here is one of the images we observed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We also discussed what a fire looks like and the kind of lines that are created by flames and heat. The children decided that they would like to represent warm colours using “wavy” lines and this is the kind of lines they drew across their page from 1 side to the other. Just like with the cool colour drawing except “wavy not spikey”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once again the children chose the colours, selecting shades of red, yellow, orange and brown “just like in a fire”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When complete some children chose to outline their warm shapes in a warm colour and highlight them using wavy lines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unfortunately I don’t have a photo to show you but when placed together the cool and warm effects were quite spectacular, with every image different yet belonging, a bit like the individual colours in the book. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our warm and cool colour investigation was an interesting part of a larger one on colour and light. Whilst these activities seem prescriptive, their purpose was about the process of representing their observations and thinking. The knowledge and understandings they gained through these particular activities have been demonstrated over and over again as the children comment on the colours used in other media including book illustrations and videos. They have also transferred these understandings into their own art, using them imgainatively and creatively.

My Many Coloured Days

Over the last 6 weeks we have been interested in colour and light. Throughout our investigation and exploration we have read lots of books about colour but there have been 3 books that have really impacted on our learning and these are One and Zero by Kathryn Otoshi and My Many Colored Days by Dr Seuss. All 3 books explore the power of colour and we have had many conversations together about how our feelings can be represented using colour. We have compared the way the books have used the same colour to represent different feelings and discussed which feeling we individually thought the colour represented.

Dr Suess’ book My Many Colored Days was the last of the 3 books we read. We found the contrast in illustrations between this book and the other 2 books interesting. This contrast was a provocation for further exploration of colour and light and we decided to paint some of the windows of the classroom in observe the effect of the light shining in through the colours.

The children began to slowly cover the windows with paint………

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

enjoying the effect of the light as it shone through.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They discovered that the amount of paint they applied affected the lights ability to shine through…….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The thicker the paint the stronger the colour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The children explored the effect of different brush strokes as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Slowly throughout these explorations and experimentations the windows were covered in paint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then we added another layer of texture using our patterned rollers……….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and white paint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This experience was really good gross motor practice as well as we stretched up high and across especially when using the roller. We also used our dotted stamps to add to the effect.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We rolled and printed all over the paint enjoying the added dimension and textures and then the painting of the windows was finished.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next day we sponge painted body shaped stencils  onto paper using colours that showed our feelings. When these were dry we cut them out and added them to our coloured windows.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our Many Coloured Day windows were finished.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We love our windows and the way the light shines through them!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We especially love the way our body shapes look like shadows.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We loved this entire process and are now going to paint our other windows and the door at the front of the classroom.

A Black and White Invitation

This week we are exploring the contrast between black and white. We have been drawing on white paper with black pens of differing thicknesses and today the children were presented with an invitation to explore this contrast even further using play dough.

 

 

 

 

 

The table was covered with a black tablecloth and on it was placed laminated black and white cards with feathers, smooth glass beads, buttons and shapes and the playdough. Unfortunately the black food colouring we used, made the playdough grey, not black, but the children were still drawn to it as we had made grey paint the day before for another project.

 

 

 

 

 

It was interesting to observe the children exploring the colour contrast between the dough and the materials.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The photos with the black/grey playdough look they are black and white but are in fact colour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

They made patterns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some children made familiar things such as birds because of the feathers.

 

 

 

 

 

A bird and nest……

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The back view of these birds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of their other creations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I first reflected upon this experience, I was a little disappointed that I had offered the feathers because the children used them to make birds but  after thinking about this some more, my intention was still successful. The children were very involved in  using the contrasting black and white materials and whilst my planning was all about the process, I also had some preconceived ideas about the product which fortunately I did not try to impose upon them. This further reflection reminded me that the process was what was really important and …….. that there are a lot of black/grey and white birds in the world including the young magpie that regularly visits inside the classroom and that prior knowledge can be a powerful tool for learning.

Storm in a Saucer

Active Learning Processes is one of the five Learning Areas in our Early Years curriculum and over the last few weeks, we have been very involved in investigating colour. These investigations to date, have included the light box, lots of experimentation with materials and of course paint. In Small Groups this week the children’s thinking was challenged as they were invited to experiment with milk, food dye and detergent. When presented with these ingredients the children discussed what they thought they could do  and predict what might happen. Naturally, after all the colour mixing they have done, the children suggested they could drip the food dyes into the  milk and make new colours by mixing them together but if that was the case, why did they have green paint? Green is not a primary colour! It took some investigation to discover that the “green paint”  was in fact detergent. It was thicker and had a smell! It was harder to suck up into the pippette.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

The children began to drip the 3 primary colours into the milk expecting them to make new colours just like with the paint but they quickly discovered that the food colours did not mix together in the milk.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WOW! Look what is happening.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The children found it interesting to observe the speed of the reaction and the way the food dye moved and “swirled” to make the new colours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After their initial experiment the children documented the reactions using crayons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After this the children continued to experiment and hypothesise about why the ingredients reacted the way they did. They found the process fascinating and fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It’s like a tornedo in the milk.”      “Look at it moving”     “It’s still going.”

The children repeated the process over and over again until the milk was lots of strange and interesting colours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The children still haven’t quite worked out the reason why the ingredients react the way they do but they are certainly enjoying the active discovery process. I’m sure they’ll get there in the end perhaps with a little help and some strategic questioning to scaffold some higher order thinking but for now it’s the wonder in the process.